Poland, 17 other Countries to Announce Major Deal Ending Coal

Poland, 17 other countries to announce a major deal to end coal. A new declaration will be signed at the United Nations climate change summit in Katowice, Poland on December 14th. The goal is to have all countries sign onto the agreement by 2020.

The declaration marks a major turnaround for Poland, a country that is one of the largest sources of carbon emissions in Europe and depends on coal for most of its electricity.

In 2015, at the Paris climate talks, Poland helped block an agreement to phase out coal by 2030 from being included as a target in the global deal. In the years since, Katowice has become ground-zero for discussions about phasing out carbon emissions around the world. The agreement will see countries all over the globe stop using coal.

Ministers from 17 EU countries are signing an agreement in which they agree to complete a process to end coal use by 2030. Countries include Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Sweden. The UK is not among them.

This is a very important step forward in taking coal off the power grid, said Paweł Sałek of Poland’s energy ministry. It would be preferable that all countries adopted the agreement by 2020. Poland will also sign an agreement to end coal subsidies.

The declaration marks a major turnaround for Poland, a country that is one of the largest sources of carbon emissions in Europe and depends on coal for most of its electricity. In 2015, at the Paris climate talks, Poland helped block an agreement to phase out coal by 2030 from being included as a target in the global deal.

In the years since, Katowice has become ground-zero for discussions about phasing out carbon emissions around the world.

The agreement will see countries all over the globe stop using coal and it is a very important step forward in taking coal off the power grid, said Paweł Sałek of Poland’s energy ministry. The declaration will be signed at the United Nations climate change summit in Katowice, Poland on December 14th.

Paweł Sałek of Poland’s energy ministry says It would be preferable that all countries adopted the agreement by 2020.

European leaders and energy bosses meet to discuss final EU budget before Brexit. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, European Council President Donald Tusk and European Parliament President Antonio Tajani have been holding talks with leaders from the EU member states over the bloc’s next long-term budget.

The EU budget is a joint effort between national governments and the Parliament, which has to approve it – so this summit will get negotiators close to an agreement.

Poland would prefer to see less focus on the environment when it comes to the EU’s next long-term budget, but more money for infrastructure development. This view is shared by leaders of other Central and Eastern European countries. They claim that the current proposal is unfair.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker says The majority of countries want a modern and flexible budget: one that responds to the challenges of our time: migration, security and defence. We need an effective European Union to deliver on this.

While some countries say they cannot give up their carefully balanced compromises on regional policy, others point out there are far more regions in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe.