Jes Staley, chief executive officer of Barclays Plc, poses for a photograph following a Bloomberg Television interview on day two of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 50th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 21 - 24. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

New Barclays CEO Quits after Investigation into Links with Jeffrey Epstein

Barclays CEO Jes Staley has resigned following an investigation into his links to Jeffrey Epstein. The decision by the bank’s Board of Directors follows allegations that Mr. Staley failed to disclose he had a personal relationship with Epstein, who is currently imprisoned in New York on federal sex trafficking and child exploitation charges.

Jes Staley has resigned as Barclays’ chief executive officer after the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) found him guilty of breaching regulations concerning employee misconduct relating to contact with hedge fund manager Steven Cohen over an investigation into possible interest rate rigging at Barclays during his tenure as head of its investment banking division.

Barclays CEO Jes Staley confirms that the British bank will close its wealth management business in Asia and divest its stake in Ping An Insurance as part of a major overhaul triggered by activist shareholder Edward Bramson.

Jes Staley is to step down as Barclays’ (LON:BARC) chief executive after an investigation concluded he broke the bank’s rules in his attempts to unmask a whistleblower.

Barclays has revealed that its first-half profits have fallen by more than half as it continues on the path of restructuring following activist shareholder Edward Bramson’s departure from the company.

Jes Staley, Barclays’ (LON:BARC) embattled chief executive and former JPMorgan investment banker, has been fined £642,430 ($808,900) and banned from running a financial firm for failing to seek permission before trying to uncover the identity of a whistle-blower.

Barclays (LON:BARC) boss Jes Staley is being investigated by the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority over his attempt to unmask a whistleblower, amid an ongoing row over the bank’s whistleblowing policies.

Barclays (LON:BARC) has appointed Jean-Pierre Mustier as its new CEO with immediate effect following Jes Staley’s resignation after being fined £642,430 ($808,900) for breaching rules on attempting to uncover whistleblowers.

Sergio Ermotti, chief executive officer of UBS Group AG (NYSE:UBS) , discusses the third-quarter results with Bloomberg’s Erik Schatzker on Bloomberg Markets. Sergiu Candussoiu reports for Bloomberg Surveillance.

Barclays CEO Jes Staley has resigned following an investigation into his links to Jeffrey Epstein. The decision by the bank’s Board of Directors follows allegations that Mr. Staley failed to disclose he had a personal relationship with Epstein, who is currently imprisoned in New York on federal sex trafficking and child exploitation charges.

Barclays CEO Jes Staley confirms that the British bank will close its wealth management business in Asia and divest its stake in Ping An Insurance as part of a major overhaul triggered by activist shareholder Edward Bramson.

Jes Staley is to step down as Barclays’ (LON:BARC) chief executive after an investigation concluded he broke the bank’s rules in his attempts to unmask a whistleblower.

Barclays has revealed that its first-half profits have fallen by more than half as it continues on the path of restructuring following activist shareholder Edward Bramson’s departure from the company.

Jes Staley, Barclays’ (LON:BARC) embattled chief executive and former JPMorgan investment banker, has been fined £642,430 ($808,900) and banned from running a financial firm for failing to seek permission before trying to uncover the identity of a whistle-blower.

Barclays (LON:BARC) boss Jes Staley is being investigated by the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority over his attempt to unmask a whistleblower, amid an ongoing row over the bank’s whistleblowing policies.