Mother Speaks Out After Calls to 911 about Child’s Medical Emergency Go Unanswered

A mother in the US has spoken out after her own daughter’s medical emergency was mishandled by authorities. The woman, who has remained anonymous for protection of her child, said she called 911 three times on Tuesday night before help arrived – but each time no one picked up. “It just made me feel like nobody cared, she told WTVD-TV. I just wanted somebody to help my baby.

A mother in the US has spoken out after her own daughter’s medical emergency was mishandled by authorities. The woman, who has remained anonymous for protection of her child, said she called 911 three times on Tuesday night before help arrived – but each time no one picked up. “It just made me feel like nobody cared, she told WTVD-TV. I just wanted somebody to help my baby.

When her daughter turned blue and stopped breathing, the mother started CPR herself. However, her desperate cries for help drew no response from the 911 line. I just felt hopeless, she said. The incident was only resolved after a neighbour came to help, and alerted police in person – who arrived minutes later.

The dispatcher reportedly claims that nobody picked up because the girl’s address wasn’t showing on the dispatch board. However, neighbours argue that this phrasing suggests it is a common problem. This is the second time in less than a month that this particular town has been in the headlines for failing to respond to emergencies – after eight cars collapsed into a sinkhole last month.

The dispatcher, named as M.D. Faruq, has reportedly been fired over the incident. This comes after the couple was awarded $100,000 (£62,000) in medical bills plus a further $500,000 (£310,000) for emotional distress – but no compensation for their house being destroyed by fire.

The lesson is simple: when in an emergency situation, call your local fire department and they will dispatch the police for you. There was no need to try calling 911 three times: in a crisis like this one, waiting means death. Always make sure you have the number for the fire department in your phone book – it’s often listed right next to 911 in most countries.